Saturday, July 3, 2010

New addition to the family.


Four legs and a tail.

We've been considering adding another member to the family for a few weeks now, and yesterday I saw an ad on Craigslist for a male black 8 month old kitten, that needed a new home due to one of the cat's owners being less than pleased with the kitten's tendencies to pick things up (baby pacifier, baby ring, wii remote, et c.) and hide them in the basement. He also liked to sleep on a living room table, and had no qualms about clearing whatever was in his path off of the table to accommodate his napping needs.

Troublesome and smart cat? Sounds a lot to me like a perfect cat. We came today to see if we *connected* with him, and frankly, I just fell in love with his behavior. Very affectionate (to complete strangers) and very attentive.

One problem: He had fleas. Let me say that again. He HAD fleas. Our cat at home, an indoor cat as well, does not, nor has she ever had fleas. I wanted to bring this gorgeous black kitten home, but I was not willing to bring the fleas with him.

We called our vet, Dr. Sig Sieber (513.321.PETS) in Hyde Park (www.HydeParkVets.com) and his assistant, Tiffany told us that she had the answer for us.

Folks, this is absolutely amazing.
It's a miracle.

We went to the vet. Tiffany gave us a pill. A tiny white pill called Capstar. We gave him the pill as we left the vet at 11:45.

We were told that the fleas would start dying in 30 minutes. THIRTY MINUTES! We got home and kept the fluffy cuss in the cat carrier until we started to see results.

At 12:15, I saw nothing and started to wonder if this magnificent beast has pulled a sleight-of-tongue on my and spit the pill out when I wasn't looking.

at 12:16, four fleas fell off of him, legs kicking like a neurotoxin invasion had just been wrought upon them.

By 12:45 there were 50 fleas wriggling in death spasms on the outside table we held him on to brush the nasty critters off of him.

I hope the person who invented this little pill is rich beyond their wildest dreams. He is flea free in just under an hour. We found a couple more near him on the white duvet, but they were both DOA.

Now, we're going to add a dose of Frontline to followup, but I have to say, this is the best stuff ever. I remember the days of flea dips, wet angry cats, scratches and stinging cuts. Those days are gone forever.

For both the Frontline and the Capstar, it cost $23.

Now we need to get the new fluffy addition used to the old fluffy addition.


He will be very happy here. And very very spoiled. And loved.

Sarah, Thank you.













































He's got big paws to fill. Very big ones.

3 comments:

Tonia said...

What a wonderful addition to to your family.

Hopefully, fleas won't be an issue for you again. But, you might also consider diatomaceous earth. It is an all natural product that is safe for you and the cats. Food grade versions are given to horses for deworming so you can find it at feed stores.

We rescued four kittens in our neighborhood with fleas and used this version:

http://www.onlynaturalpet.com/products/Only-Natural-Pet-All-in-One-Flea-Remedy/999013.aspx

While it is more work than pills or the more common topical treatments, we were able to use it on the kittens and the carpet in the room where they were initially kept. Usually you have to remove the animals in order to treat the carpet, which wasn't an option for us. It worked like a charm

BunnyMendelbaum said...

Adorable! Congratulations. I've tried Capstar before too, too bad our cat develops temporary lock-jaw whenever a pill comes within a 3 foot radius.
I have giving her the chemicals (like frontline), but it beats fleas!

The Wife said...

Bunny, I have a trick that was taught to me years ago and it seems to work for me, maybe it will for you:

1. Put the pill in the cat's mouth, on the tongue, as far back as you can without losing a finger or too much blood.
2. Gently press and hold the cat's jaws together.
3. Blow lightly into his/her nose until you see a swallow reflex.

Something about blowing into their nostrils makes them do a kind-of-reverse-gag reflex... and they swallow!